• 4th February 2016 - By Indian Accent Restaurant

    Chef Mehrotra, who is also fondly called Maestro Mehrotra, shares with us a couple of his favourite recipes from the cookbook. Try them. Relish them.

    If you are looking for a reservation at this popular and acclaimed restaurant, chances are that you may have to wait for weeks or even months to get one. In fact, the rumour is that even well-heeled and well-connected clientele have to pull some strings to secure a reservation if they are in a hurry.

    The Indian Accent restaurant at New Friends Colony (West) is undoubtedly among the most successful and talked about eateries in the national Capital right now. And the man who has cooked its sumptuous success story is one of the most recognised faces to Indian gastronomy – chef Manish Mehrotra.

    Combining innovation with fresh ingredients, what chef Mehrotra creates in his kitchen and brings to your plate is nothing less than a delectable magic.

    The food at Indian Accent has received rave reviews from critics as – and it has fetched some coveted awards. It is the only restaurant from India in the S. Pellegrino list of 100 Best Restaurants in the World 2015. And it’s only the food critics who can’t get enough of what the Indian Accent is serving.

    Its customers love it so much that it is the No 1 restaurant in India on Trip Advisor. Recently, chef Mehrotra came out with the Indian Accent Restaurant Cookbook, sharing some of the most loved and lauded recipes of the restaurant.

    The cookbook offers a host of recipes that promises to excite and satisfy your palate. Chef Mehrotra, who is also fondly called ‘Maestro Mehrotra, shares with us a couple of his favourite recipes from the cookbook. Try them. Relish them.

    Haji Ali-inspired custard apple cream

    Custard apple, called sharifa or sitaphal in Hindi, is a fruit unique to India. It is available only for three months during winter. Delicate in taste, it is, however, tedious to eat as it contains many seeds. There is a juice stall outside the Haji Ali shrine in Mumbai where I chanced upon ‘sitaphal cream’ for the fi rst time. Coming from Bihar, I thought sitaphal was red pumpkin. Little did I know it was also the name of the fruit I knew as custard apple! Haji Ali sitaphal cream became such a temptation that we would sneak out of the college hostel late at night to eat it. When creating the Indian Accent menu, I knew I had to pay homage by including Haji Ali in the name of the dessert we serve.

    Ingredients:
    Custard apple (sitaphal/sharifa) 250 gm
    Fresh double cream 3 tbsp
    Fine sugar (if required) 1 tbsp
    Amaranth laddoo – 1

    Method:
    Scrape out pulp from the custard apples. Run the pulp through a fine sieve to remove the seeds. Check to ensure that all seeds have been removed. Add fresh cream to the sieved pulp. Add sugar only if required, in case the custard apple is not sweet enough. Chill the custard apple and cream mixture for at least 2-3 hours. Serve when chilled. Place the custard apple cream in a bowl. Serve with an amaranth laddoo.

    Raw and ripe mango daulat ki chaat, Mango candy brittle

    Today, foam and air are the rage in molecular gastronomy. India has been eating milk foam since Mughal times. Daulat ki chaat in Delhi, nimish in Lucknow, makhan malai in Kanpur, or malaiyo in Varanasi – they are all the same milk-foam treat, made only in winter. At Indian Accent, we prepare flavoured daulat ki chaat which is served all year round.Ingredients for ripe mango mix:
    Mango pulp 50 ml
    Double cream 20 ml
    Milk 30 ml Sugar (if required) to taste
    Butter – 20gm 1 cup
    Grated hard cheese (local) – 100gm
    Black pepper crushed – to taste

    For raw mango mix:
    Raw mangoes 20 gm
    Mint leaves, chopped 1 tsp
    Double cream 20 ml
    Milk 40 ml Sugar (if required) to taste

    To serve:
    Mango candy brittle as garnish (optional)

    Method prepare ripe mango mix:
    Blend ripe mango pulp with cream and milk in a blender. The mixure should be of a pourable consistency. Add sugar to taste only if the mixture is not sweet enough. Strain the mixture through a fi ne sieve or muslin cloth. Keep chilled.

    Featured in India Today

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